RED ALERT: How to Stop Smoking Weed Cold Turkey

You have your reasons. It’s time to stop smoking weed once and for all, and today is the day you will get it done.

Quitting weed cold turkey isn’t as hard as it might seem, and the problems that arise in the process could be used to make yourself healthier in a variety of ways. Find out if quitting weed cold-turkey is a good idea in your situation, and learn how to do it in five simple steps.

What is cold turkey?

We daren’t look into the etymology of the term, but in recovery circles, “cold turkey” refers to when you quit a substance you’re addicted to all at once instead of gradually. Sudden and intense, the cold-turkey approach to quitting weed has its merits, but it’s only appropriate if you really need quick results.

Is it okay to quit smoking weed cold turkey?

Yes, it is okay to stop quitting weed in any way you like — including all at once. The only exception to this rule is if you have been prescribed medical marijuana for a specific condition by a doctor. Simply being addicted to THC is not an adequate excuse for avoiding quitting.

Should you quit smoking weed cold turkey?

Before you decide to suddenly quit smoking weed right this very moment, take some time to determine if such a dramatic approach is really required in your situation. It certainly might be, but it’s entirely possible that a more relaxed method could be the appropriate one based on your specific needs. Try asking people who know you if they think you have a problem with THC, and spend a few hours sober to see if you can stand being around yourself when you aren’t high.

Does quitting weed cold turkey help with a drug test?

It is very unlikely that the way in which you quit THC will have any impact on the results of a drug test. If you are a habitual THC user, it will take around 30 days for this cannabinoid to leave your system regardless of how quickly you quit. Simply assume that from the last day you ingest weed, THC will remain in your system for at least 30 days.

Quit smoking weed today in 5 simple steps

1. Get rid of your dro

Before you do anything else, get all the weed and paraphernalia out of your house. Make sure people around you don’t have any weed, and think carefully about how you’re going to avoid THC during the quitting process.

2. Prepare for a ride

We’re still learning about THC addiction and how it affects people as they withdraw. For some, withdrawals are mild or even difficult to notice. Heavy, habitual THC users, though, generally have a harder time letting go of their favorite cannabinoid. Some of the most common symptoms of THC withdrawal include:

  • Nausea
  • Sweating
  • Chills
  • Insomnia
  • Irritability
  • Paranoia
  • Anxiety
  • Depression

3. Secure social support

In most cases the symptoms of THC withdrawal dissipate within 2-3 days. During that time, though, you may be significantly compromised and face difficulty accomplishing your normal daily tasks. Before you suddenly up and quit weed, take some time to make sure the people around you know what you’re doing and are prepared to take care of the trainwreck you’re about to become.

4. Acquire an alternative

Just because delta 9 THC ended up becoming a problem for you doesn’t mean that everything in cannabis is equally bad. Switching out delta 9 for delta 8 might just be an example of replacing one problem with another, but non-intoxicating cannabinoids like CBD and CBG provide relaxing benefits recovering weed addicts love — all while not getting you high.

Ponder a couple of reviews as you determine if hemp might be a suitable stand-in for weed in your circumstances:

  • Secret Nature Forbidden Fruit CBD Hemp Vape Cartridge review - . “ ★★★★★ “Forbidden fruit is a great strain. The taste is great and the effects are amazing too. It helps with anxiety,pain,and to get some deep rest. Secret nature is the best brand out there.”

5. Develop a long-term game plan

As a habit, weed might crop up in another way the moment you let your guard down. Make an effort to truly understand the impact weed had on your life, and as you develop a plan to stay off weed, think in the long-term even if it means avoiding solutions that sound attractive today.

FAQ: Quitting weed ASAP

#1) Can quitting weed raise blood pressure?

Some people report reductions in blood pressure when they use cannabinoids, so in these cases, a corresponding increase in blood pressure is to be expected when you quit. For people who didn’t have issues with high blood pressure before smoking weed, however, it’s unlikely that such issues would suddenly appear upon quitting.

#2) Why do I sweat so much after quitting weed?

Copious sweating is one of the most commonly reported symptoms of THC withdrawal. Various theories have been proposed regarding why people sweat when they detox, and it’s possible that your body is trying to remove THC via your sweat. Sweating during withdrawals can be very uncomfortable; try a hot shower or bath to give your struggling body some relief.

#3) How long does paranoia last after quitting weed?

Some people report experiencing paranoia when they stop smoking weed, but this symptom usually goes away after a few days. Ironically, paranoia is also one of the side effects of THC many people are trying to liberate themselves of by quitting.

If you continue feeling paranoid a week or so after you stopped using THC, consider seeking professional medical attention. It’s rare, but some people can experience long-lasting psychological debilitation as a result of THC addiction, and any lasting paranoia, anxiety, or depression after quitting weed could be indicative of an underlying need for mental health assistance.

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