How to Reduce Your THC Tolerance: 5 Tips

THC tolerance can take all the fun out of smoking weed. Learn why you can get a tolerance to THC and what you can do about it in this guide. We’ll cover five useful tips you can use to reduce your THC tolerance and get more enjoyment out of your THC use from here on out.

What is THC tolerance?

  • THC tolerance is when THC becomes less effective over time
  • It’s caused by overloading your cannabinoid receptors
  • You can usually get over THC tolerance by taking a break
  • There also might be certain steps you should take to permanently rebalance your relationship with THC

The term “THC tolerance” refers to an acclimation to the psychoactive cannabinoid THC that reduces the intensity of your high and can lead to using larger doses. It’s usually possible to overcome THC tolerance and return to your usual sensitivity by abstaining from this cannabinoid for a while.

THC tolerance appears to have both a biochemical and psychological side. Your cannabinoid receptors observably become less attenuated when you use large amounts of THC for a long time, and it’s also possible to become psychologically dependent on the rush of endorphins that accompanies inhaling THC.

For many users, THC tolerance takes all the fun out of smoking weed. Over time, it appears that THC tolerance can promote addiction by leading THC users to ingest ever-higher doses in attempts to reclaim that original, nostalgic high.

What to do about THC tolerance

THC tolerance doesn’t have to be a problem. It’s just a wake-up call to the fact that you and THC are out of balance with each other. Try the following five techniques to come back into harmony with your favorite cannabinoid:

#1) Take a tolerance break (T break)

Taking a tolerance break is the most commonly suggested way to get over THC tolerance. A tolerance break, or “T break,” consists of temporarily not using THC in order to reset your neurochemistry back to its original state.

Most experts suggest that a period of 3-14 days is ideal for a tolerance break. While taking a T break might make your next high extra-special, this method won’t resolve underlying tendencies to misuse THC thatcontributed to the development of a tolerance in the first place.

#2) Control dosing more carefully

One of the main reasons you might have developed a THC tolerance is that you’re using this cannabinoid irresponsibly. Unlike cannabinoids that don’t make you feel as good, THC has a tendency to make you want to use more and more of it.

If you use less THC, though, your brain will be able to recover more between doses, “resetting the circuit board” and allowing THC to activate more fully and more satisfyingly. You aren’t getting more high by sitting there and smoking weed non-stop: In reality, you’re less high than that guy you know who only takes 3-5 hits per day.

#3) Don’t let withdrawals take you by surprise

If you’re using too much THC, reducing your intake is going to be uncomfortable. At the very least, you’re going to be grumpy and slightly depressed, and some people experience very strong withdrawal symptoms when they stop using high daily quantities of THC.

THC withdrawals are different for everyone, but some common symptoms include:

  • Unpredictable mood
  • Depression
  • Nausea
  • Lack of appetite
  • Brain fog
  • Insomnia
  • Headaches
  • Sweating

#4) Switch to CBD

It’s possible that THC has become a little unhinged during its long separation from its entourage. CBD naturally accompanies THC in cannabis, and this non-intoxicating cannabinoid might come to the rescue if you’re having issues with THC tolerance.

CBD acts on different neuroreceptors from THC, providing a unique effect that entirely bypasses your THC tolerance. Unlike THC, CBD does not get you high, but a period of sobriety might be just what you need to solve your THC crisis long-term.

A CBD pre-roll or vape cartridge will entirely recreate the taste, smell, and overall experience of smoking weed, but it won’t get you high. Consider CBD the “non-alcoholic beer of weed;” it mimics the experience but skips the intoxication.

#5) Try delta 8

Delta 8 THC is almost exactly the same as delta 9 THC, but some users have noted that switching to delta 8 provides remarkably intense highs even with advanced THC tolerance. It’s possible that delta 8 acts on the brain just differently enough to bypass THC tolerance.

THC users might find a long-term solution in delta 8. In many parts of the country, ordering D8 online is a lot easier than buying D9 at a dispensary.

  • Secret Nature Delta 8 THC Hemp Vape Cartridge review - Mike D. “My favorite carts!” ★★★★★ “The Super 8 cart is my new favorite, both the Indica and Sativa! I take a couple hits of the sativa when I get in from work and the Indica before bed to relax and it does the job!”

Reducing your THC tolerance FAQ

How do you get an effective tolerance break?

To make sure your tolerance break is effective, you’ll have to stop using THC long enough for your neurochemistry to reset and also come back to THC from a different angle. If you start using THC as heavily and wastefully as you did before, you’ll inevitably need to take another tolerance break sooner or later.

How long does it take for cannabinoid receptors to return to normal?

Some research indicates that it takes a full 30 days of total abstinence from THC for your CB1 receptors (the main neuroreceptors responsible for THC intoxication) to return to their original condition. If true, this research would indicate that the usual 14-day T break isn’t long enough to truly be effective. Try a month instead just to make sure.

How do you get better highs?

The best way to improve the high you experience from THC is to use this intoxicating cannabinoid more sparingly. Used in regular, controlled doses, THC delivers far greater rewards than when you overindulge in this all-too-enjoyable cannabinoid.

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